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School of Language Sciences, Literatures, and Cultures Collaborative Research

Multilingual and Multicultural Intersections

Call for Collaborative Research Projects

Deadline to submit Letter of Intent: March 16, 2018
Deadline to submit Draft Proposal: April 13, 2018
Deadline to submit Final Proposal: May 11, 2018
Funding project period: 05/16/2018 - 06/30/2019

Research Showcase - November 9, 2017

Crayon illustrator of three white geese holding briefcases flying over water.

Migration Studies and the Humanist Perspective

Team Members:

Miguel A. Cabañas, Spanish and Latin American Literatures and Cultures
Gabriela Alfaraz, Spanish Sociolinguistics
Danny Méndez, Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Bill VanPatten, Second Language Studies
Camelia Suleiman, Arabic Studies

Presenter:

Miguel A. Cabañas, Spanish and Latin American Literatures and Cultures

Abstract:

What is migration? What are of the consequences of migration in our world? These are the two questions we seek to explore from an interdisciplinary perspective. Migration has been typically studied in the Social Sciences, however, the Humanities have much to say about the issues of migration and cultural hybridization that occur at the level of language, individual and group experiences, affect, identity, and the understanding of human communities and their history. This project will strengthen the environment of collaboration, not just at The School of Language Sciences and Cultural Studies, but also by engaging with other programs on campus, such as Chicano/Latino Studies, Sociology, Anthropology, History, English, African and African American Studies (AAA), and Area Studies Centers (CLACS, Asian Studies, European Studies, CASID, Muslim Studies, Jewish Studies.)


 

Black and white illustration of a woman in a dark hooded sweatshirt flying over a city while crying

Writing History/Visualizing Trauma: Graphic Narratives in Cross-Cultural Contexts

Team Members:

Liz Mittman, German Studies, Visual and Film Studies
Lynn Wolff, German Literature and Culture
Matt Handelman, German Literature and Culture
Kathryn McEwen, German-Language Literature and Culture
Safoi Babana-Hampton, French and Francophone Studies
Valentina Denzel, French and Italian Literature
Catherine Ryu, Japanese Literature and Culture

Presenter:

Liz Mittman, German Studies, Visual and Film Studies

Abstract:

With this inaugural project, the Graphic Narratives Network (GNN) examines the representation of history and trauma in the unique hybrid form of graphic narratives. Often multinational, multilingual, and multicultural, these works represent experiences of violence, displacement, and loss at the interstices of text and image. This new interdisciplinary network combines the interests and expertise of faculty members from LGSAAL and RCS. Through internal work sessions and public-facing symposia, digitization of source materials, and creation of a rich website, the GNN aims both to enhance local research collaborations and to increase MSU’s visibility in the rapidly expanding field of text-image studies.


 

four small black and white pictures with text above that says "picturing others"

Picturing Others: Indigenous Photography, (Self) Portraits, Preservation and Epistemic Disobedience

Team Members:

Safoi Babana-Hampton, French and Francophone Studies
Candace Keller, African Art History
Rocío Quispe-Agnoli, Latin American Indigenous Studies
Laura Smith, Art History and American Indian Studies

Presenter:

Rocío Quispe-Agnoli, Latin American Indigenous Studies

Abstract:

What does an Indigenous photographer of 1920s Peru have in common with a mid-twentieth century American Indian photographer and contemporary Malian and Moroccan photographers? This is the question that started our journey of inquiry about photography, portraits and self-portraits, (self) identification, looking at others along with questions about Indigenous gaze, perception, and representation. Martín Chambi, Horace Poolaw, Tijani Sitou, and Leila Alaoui were/are visual artists that represent(ed) themselves, their people, and also those who have dominated the political power in their nations. Thanks to this grant, each of us is conducting archival research in photographic archives; we are organizing a seminar-workshop with four guests from other institutions in mid-April 2018; and we are building a web portal (open to all collaborators, open access) that will feature our reflection on the subject as well as resources.


 

a man with short dark hair and his arms crossed standing in front of a large metal globe sculpture.

Global Student Citizens Engaging Identity Politics in a Multilingual World

Team Members:

Peter DeCosta, Second Language Studies
Koen Van Gorp, Center for Language Teaching Advancement 
Scott Schopieray, Educational Technology

Presenter:

Matthew Deroo, Curriculum, Instruction, and Teacher Education
Hima Rawal, Second Language Studies

Abstract:

This collaborative project aims to develop a team-taught course focusing on identity and power issues that have divided our contemporary world. Our goal is to enable students to recognize the intricate mechanisms that define power (im)balances and show them how identities interact and are shaped by societal norms and dominant ideologies. Recognizing and analyzing these mechanisms empower students to transform their personal relations and experiences as well as those of others. The students will participate in hands-on, ethnographic-oriented research projects (e.g., linguistic landscapes) that will be documented as digital stories for future cohorts of Citizen Scholars to build on.


 

A stack of books on the left hand side on top of a blue background.

Developing self-paced online modules to prepare students for LLT 863

Team Members:

Patti Spinner, Second Language Studies
Adolfo Ausin, Spanish Linguistics

Presenter:

Adolfo Ausin, Spanish Linguistics

Abstract:

The goal of this curricular project is to create an online module for the instruction of introductory linguistic concepts in grammar for second language professionals in the TESOL program and in Romance and Classical Studies, with possible future expansion to other programs or even outside of MSU. The basic online module may be adapted for specialized use by various programs. We would like to have the module ready for Fall 2017, when it could be used both by students in the Spanish program and by SLS students getting ready to take LLT 863.


 

A dark haired woman with a headset on looking at a person displayed on a computer screen

Online and Hybrid Language Teaching Collaboration Project

Team Members:

Shawn Loewen, Second Language Acquisition
Shannon Spasova, Slavic Languages and Literature
Adam Gacs, Spoken Language Discourse and Corpus Analysis

Presenter:

Shawn Loewen, Second Language Acquisition

Abstract:

The teaching of online and hybrid second language (L2) courses continues to increase; however, quality instruction is not guaranteed, even if teachers are experienced in face-to-face classes. Instead, teachers need adequate training to transition to online and hybrid classes. Furthermore, technical support is necessary to ensure the delivery of high-quality instruction. Finally, research needs to investigate the effects of online instruction. This grant proposal endeavors to build faculty capacity in online teaching through workshops and small group mentoring. In addition, research is proposed to investigate the nature and effectiveness of online L2 instruction, especially in terms of L2 production.